Polyneices

Antigone

The two sons, Eteocles and Polyneices, agree to rule Thebes alternately. But when it is time for Eteocles to step aside for his brother, Polyneices, he refuses.

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Keystone Exams Overview

Wilson School District Town Hall Meeting September 28, 2010 Topic: Keystone Exams

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Antigone by Sophocles

Antigone asks for her sister's help in burying her brother Polyneices, and Ismene refuses. Ismene rejects her sister. Parados the song sung by the chorus as it makes its entrance The Theban elders describe the events of the Seven Against Thebes and thank the gods that the attack of Polyneices has been ...

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Sophocles

Sophocles ANTIGONE Because of the curse that their father had laid upon them, ETEOCLES and POLYNEICES quarreled about the royal power, and POLYNEICES was finally driven from Thebes.

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TEACHER’S PET PUBLICATIONS LITPLAN TEACHER PACK™ for ANTIGONE

Since Polyneices broke his exile and attacked the city of Thebes, Creon considers Polyneices a traitor. 4. What news does the sentry bring to Creon?

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Antigone Questions

Which words and phrases in lines 10-13 extend the metaphor of Polyneices as a fierce, warlike eagle? 2. How does Sophocles personify the spears of Polyneices' forces?

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HOMEWORK QUESTIONS/STUDY GUIDE FOR QUIZZES/TEST

How was it decided which of the sentries would bring the news about Polyneices to Creon? 6. How does Creon believe the act of burying Polyneices was carried out?

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Antigone Questions: Scene 1

Is Creon justified when he commands that no one should bury Polyneices? Why? 4. What does the Sentry's behavior when he first arrives reveal about Creon's reputation?

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Antigone: The Prologue and Parodos

In lines 32-76 of the Exodos, the Messenger says that Creon buried Polyneices first and then went to free Antigone. How do you predict events might have turned out if Creon had reversed the order of his tasks?

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Antcontents

On the other hand, Creon must have his nephew Polyneices in mind in his opening address (162-90) and uses the same masculine adjectives, but philos/philoi become "friend(s)".

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